Gloucester House, Piccadilly

Venue Type & Location

Private Residence

Site Name: Gloucester House, Piccadilly
Location: London
County: London (city-county)
Location Type: Town - in town at determined location

Overview

  • Address: Corner of Piccadilly and Park Lane, London. For a current map,
    Click Here.



  • Alternate Names: Elgin House (pre-1816)



  • Audience Composition: As the private residence of the Duke of Gloucester, the venue was patronized by invited aristocratic guests.



  • Performance Space Description: Images suggest that Gloucester House was a rather large, imposing structure of several storeys. Specifics about the performance space within the residence have not yet been found.



  • Performance History

  • Before it was purchased by the Duke of Gloucester, Gloucester House had been home to Thomas Bruce, the 7th Earl of Elgin. The Elgin Marbles were housed there for a time, before being transported to Burlington House and the British Museum.



  • The mansion became the city residence of Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh, and his wife Princess Mary shortly after they married in 1816. The Duchess continued using the residence after her husband’s death in 1834, and herself perished there in 1857.



  • Though much of the building’s external architecture still stands, the interior has been transformed into luxury apartments. The ground floor has also been home to the London Hard Rock Café since 1971.



    Please see the 'Bibliographic Sources' link at right for a complete listing of materials (both primary and secondary) from which the above information was compiled.


    Beth Marquis

  • Troupes at Gloucester House, Piccadilly

    Troupe Troupe Type # of events
    Ethiopian Serenaders (1846-48) Minstrel 1

    Events at Gloucester House, Piccadilly

    Event Date Venue Location Troupe
    Minstrel Show 24 February 1846 - 24 February 1846 London, London (city-county) Ethiopian Serenaders (1846-48)

    Bibliographic Sources

    • "A little too much of what we fancy”. Telegraph (Online). August 11, 2001. 03/22/2008 (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/main.jhtml?xml=/property/2001/08/11/pglouc11.xml)
    • Timbs, John. Curiosities of London (1855). London: David Bogue, 1855.
    • Walford, Edward. Old and New London Vol. 4 (1878). Reproduced at British History Online. 03/21/2008 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/source.aspx?pubid=342)

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